January 24, 2015

Rework (《重来》)读书笔记

Rework (《重来》)读书笔记

这本书赫赫有名,事实上我也在很久以前就看过了,不过最近又把它翻了出来并写了读书笔记。以下所有的中英文摘抄都是我一字字对着书敲上去的(哭),应该会有一些错误,如果看到还请麻烦指出来,有时间我也会多检查几遍。我把英文原文也附了上来,一是原文更地道一些,二是书中简洁的表达的确值得学习。

开局篇 CHAPTER FIRST

卸负篇 CHAPTER TAKEDOWNS

“现实世界”并不存在,那只是个借口,只是某个人为了开脱自己的无所作为,跟你一点关系都没有。

The real world isn’t a place, it’s an excuse. It’s a justification for not trying. It has nothing to do with you.

相比之下,你更应该从成功中汲取养分。成功才是真正靠得住的教材。做成一件事后,你会知道这条路行得通——然后你就会再次这么做,而下一次,你还会做的更棒。失败并不是成功的先决条件。

Contrast that with learning from your success. Success gives you real ammunition. When something succeeds, you know what worked — and you can do it again. And the next time, you’ll probably do it even better. Failure is not a prerequisite for success.

不必感到惊讶:这就是自然规律。逗留在过去的失败中是无法进化的,进化是建立在成功的基础上的。你也应该如此。

That shouldn’t be a surprise: It’s exactly how nature works. Evolution doesn’t linger on past failures, it always building upon what worked. So should you.

你必须能够即兴发挥,你必须抓住每一个迎面而来的机遇。有时候你得说服自己:“我们要换个新方向了,因为现在这么做比较靠谱。”

And you have to be able to improvise. You have to be able to pick up opportunities that come alone. Sometimes you need to say, “We’re going in a new direction because that’s what makes sense today.”

长期计划中的时间表也属于无稽之谈。你只有在做一件事的过程中,才能掌握更多的相关信息,没有人能够未卜先知。千万不要在行动之前就做出重大的决定。

The timing of long-range plans is screwed up too. You have the most information when you’re doing something, not before you’ve done it. Yet when do you write a plan? Usually it’s before you’ve even begun. That’s the worst time to make a big decision.

小公司并不只是一块跳板。小公司本身就是一个伟大的目标。

Small is not just a stepping-stone. Small is a great destination in itself.

不要因为瞄准小公司就觉得缺乏安全感。无论是谁,只要他所运营的公司能够持续发展、保持盈利,不管规模大小,都是值得骄傲的。

Don’t be insecure about aiming to be a small business. Anyone who runs a business that’s sustainable and profitable, whether it’s big or small, should be proud.

工作狂的行为不但没有必要,而且愚蠢之极。过多的工作并不代表你对项目更关注,也不代表你做了更多贡献,这仅仅意味着你干了更多话而已。

Not only is this workaholism unnecessary, it’s stupid. Working more doesn’t mean you care more or get more done. It just means you work more.

如果你只是为工作而工作,那么你就会丧失判断力。你的价值观和决策方式都是扭曲的。你没有能力去判断哪些工作值得做、哪些工作该放弃,最后搞得自己筋疲力尽,而一个筋疲力尽的人是无法做出明智的决定的。

If all you do is work, you’re unlikely to have sound judgments. Your values and decision making wind up skewed. You stop being able to decide what’s worth extra effort and what’s not. And you wind up just plain tired. No one makes sharp decisions when tired.

工作狂不是英雄。他们没有力挽狂澜,不过是浪费时间而已。真正的英雄早已想出办法、搞定一切,然后回家了。

Workaholics aren’t heroes. They don’t save the day, they just use it up. The real hero is already home because she figured out a faster way to get things done.

我们应该鼓励每一个人都去开创自己的事业,不要让这等好事只落在那些凤毛麟角、自认为自己才是企业家的人头上。

Everyone should be encouraged to start his own business, not just some rare breed that self-identifies as entrepreneurs.

你所需要的只是一个创意,加一点点自信,以及一点勇气,就可以启程了。

You just need an idea, a touch of confidence, and a push to get started.

行动篇 CHAPTER GO

欲成大事,就要让自己与众不同,要在宇宙中留下有意义的一笔,要让世人知道你在做的是一件重要的事情。

To do great work, you need to feel that you’re making a difference. That you’re putting a meaningful dent in the universe. That you’re part of something important.

你不必去攻克癌症,只要冲着有价值的方向去努力,要让你的客户说:“这个东西让我的生活变得更美好了。”如果你不做这件事了,人们就会觉得不对劲。

This doesn’t mean you need to find the cure for cancer. It’s just that your efforts need to feel valuable. You want your customers to say, “This makes my life better.” You want to feel that if you stopped doing what you do, people would notice.

同时,做这件事,你还要有紧迫感。人的一生是有限的,而这件事就应该是你愿意毕生而为的工作。难道你愿意终身复制别人的产品或者只是搭配、组合别人的东西吗?你应该创造你独有的传承。不要只是坐在原地等着别人来为你做出改变,不要以为你得需要一个大的团队才能做出一番别样的事业来。

You should feel an urgency about this too. You don’t have forever. This is your life’s work. Do you want to build just another me-too product or do you want to shake things up? What you do is your legacy. Don’t sit around and wait for someone else to make the change you want to see. And don’t think it takes a huge team to make that difference either.

要做就做举足轻重的事情,这些小人物发迹于草莽,却破坏了已经存在了数十年的传统模式。你也能在自己的行业里做出同样的壮举。

If you’re going to do something, do something that matters. These little guys came out of nowhere and destroyed old models that had been around for decades. You can do the same in your industry.

想要创造一个伟大的产品或某项卓越的服务,最简单直接的办法就是做你自己想用的东西。设计你了解的产品——你就能很快发现它到底好不好用。

The easiest, most straightforward way to create a great product or service is to make something you want to use. That lets you design what you know — and you’ll figure out immediately whether or not what you’re making is any good.

库布里克明白,当你开始一项工作时,你必须开始创造自己的东西。最重要的就是起而行之。

Kubrick knew that when you’re new at something, you need to start creating. The most important thing is to begin.

创意这玩意儿,价廉物美,应有尽有。最开始的鼓槌音高的创意也不过是业务中几乎可以被忽略的极小一部分。真正的问题在于你执行的好坏。

Ideas are cheap and plentiful. The original pitch idea is such a small part of a business that it’s almost negligible. The real question is how well you execute.

当你拥有某种极强烈的渴望时,你就能挤出时间来——不管你身上是否还背负着其他责任。事实上,大部分人的渴望并不是那么强烈。于是他们那时间当借口来进行自我保护。不要再扔出一堆借口来妄图脱身了,你的终极职责就是让你自己的梦想成真。

When you want something bad enough, you make the time — regardless of your other obligations. The truth is most people just don’t want it bad enough. Then they protect their ego with the excuse of time. Don’t let yourself off the hook with excuses. It’s entirely your responsibility to make your dreams come true.

另外,永远不会有正当其时的时候,你总会觉得要么年纪太轻,要么太老,要么太忙,抑或是其他什么原因。如果你总是为找不到完美的时刻而困扰,那么,完美的时机永远不会出现。

Besides, the perfect time never arrives. You’re always too young or old or busy or broke or something else. If you constantly fret about timing things perfectly, they’ll never happen.

起步之后,你必须一直牢记自己到底为什么要做这件事。有主见方能成大事,创业并不只是一个产品或一项服务那么简单。你必须心怀信念,要有主心骨,要了解自己到底是为什么而奋斗,并且要让世人明白你的信念。

As you get going, keep in mind why you’re doing what you’re doing. Great businesses have a point of view, not just a product or service. You have to believe in something. You need to have a backbone. You need to know what you;re willing to fight for. And then you need to show the world.

坚定的信念能为你赢得超级粉丝,他们会违逆马首是瞻,会舍身保护你,他们充满激情的口碑传播将胜过世上一切的广告。

A strong stand is how you attract super fans. They point to you and defend you. And they spread the word further, wider, and more passionately than any advertising could.

我们追求简洁的设计,因为大多数软件都过于复杂:太多特性、太多按钮、太多困惑。我们要做与之不同的软件。如果我们的产品不适合于每一个人,没有关’,我们愿意为了那些更加深爱我们产品的客户而放弃另一部分客户。这就是我们的立场。

We design them to be simple because we believe most software is too complex: too many features, too many buttons, too much confusion. So we build software that’s the opposite of that. If what we make isn’t right for everyone, that’s OK. We’re willing to lose some customers if it means that others love our products intensely. That’s our line in the sand.

坚守某种信念并不仅仅是把它写下来。不但要相信它,还要让它成为你的生活方式。

Standing for something isn’t just about writing it down. It’s about believing and living it.

花别人的钱听起来很美,实际上是你落入了圈套。理由如下:1)失去控制权;2)“套现离场”的想法会压倒“创建优秀公司”的梦想;3)用别人的钱容易上瘾;4)融资都不是好买卖;5)客户不再荣登“图腾柱”;6)筹钱极其费神。

Spending other people’s money may sound great, but there’s a noose attached. Here’s why: 1) You give up control; 2) “Cashing out” begins to trump building a quality business; 3) Spending other people’s money is addictive; 4) It’s usually a bad deal; 5) Customers move down the totem pole; 6) Raising money is incredibly distracting.

节俭不是罪过。当我们推出第一个产品时,是非常节俭的。

There’s nothing wrong with being frugal. When we launched our first product, we did it on the cheap.

伟大的公司基本上都起于微末。你的也一样。

Great companies start in garages all the time. Yours can too.

真正的事业从创始的第一天开始就要求你去操心如何盈利的问题。真正的事业拒绝创业者用“没关系,创业嘛!”这样的借口去掩盖深层次的问题。一开始就要去做真正的事业,这样才能大大提高成功率。

Actual business have to deal with actual things like billing and payroll. Actual business worry about profit from day one. Actual business don’t mask deep problems by saying, “It’s OK, we’re a startup.” Act like an actual business and you’ll have a much better shot at succeeding.

如果你真的想努力做有奔头的事,那就不要放手。天上掉下的馅饼不会一直砸在你头上,不要让你的大号事业成为别人的嫁衣。

If you do manage to get a good thing going, keep it going. Good things don’t come around that often. Don’t let your business be the one that got away.

一定要轻装上阵。此时,你正处于最小巧、最轻松、跑的最快的阶段。

Embrace the idea of having less mass. Right now, you’re the smallest, the leanest, and the fastest you’ll ever be.

进阶篇 CHAPTER PROGRESS

“少”不是什么坏事。“条件受限”貌似缺陷,实为优势。有限的资源能激发你在现有条件下完成任务的能力。没有一点浪费的空间,一切都需要你发挥最大的创造力。

Less is a good thing. Constrains are advantages in disguise. Limited resources force you to make do with what you’ve got. There’s no room for waste. And that forces you to be creative.

有舍才有得,砍掉多余的野心,你就会发现慢慢做一件正事要胜过毛毛躁躁做一堆傻事。

So sacrifice some of your darlings for the greater good. Cut your ambition in half. You’re better off with a kick-ass half than a half assed whole.

所以,要判断出你的事业的中心。在你的创业等式中,哪个部分是绝对不能被拿掉的?如果有些东西即使没有了,你也能把事情干下去,那这些东西就不是事业的中心。当你发现事业的中心时,你就会恍然大悟,然后你应该把所有精力都集中在这个中心上,把它做的越强越好。这是你未来成功的基础。

So figure out your epicenter. Which part of your equation can’t be removed? If you can continue to get by without this thing or that thing, then these things aren’t the epicenter. When you find it, you’ll know. Then focus all your energy on making it the best it can be. Everything else you do depends on that foundation.

请忽略细节——至少是在一段时间内。先把基础打牢,再去操心其他的事情。

Ignore the details — for a wile. Nail the basics first and worryabout the specifics later.

此外,你只有在真正开始后,才能认清到底哪些细节才是最重要的。到那时你才能看清哪些方面需要多花些时间。缺什么补什么,不要操之过急。

Besides, you often can’t recognize the details that matter most until after you start building. That’s when you see what needs more attention. You feel what’s missing. And that’s when you need to pay attention, not sooner.

只要有可能,就不要说“让我们考虑一下”,而是“让我们做决定吧”。主动作出决定,不要苦等最佳方案,要积极决策,果断前进。

Whenever you can, swap “Let’s think about it” for “Let’s decide on it.” Commit to making decisions. Don’t wait for the perfect solution. Decide and move forward.

只要有足够的动力和士气,就要趁热打铁,积极决策,果断推进,现在就把事情做出来。

Long projects zap morale. The longer it takes to develop, the less likely it is to launch. Make the call, make progress, and get something out now — while you’ve got the motivation and momentum to do so.

真正能够有意义的是那些挂在墙上的东西。因此你需要不断地审视它们,随时取走一部分、简化一部分、是之合理化。要做一个称职的博物馆长,坚守真正重要的东西。把其他东西拿下来,直到留下最重要的作品。然后再来一次。以后有需要时,你还是能把拿下来的东西放回去的。

It’s the stuff you leave out that matters. So constantly look for things to remove, simplify, and streamline. Be a curator. Stick to what’s truly essential. Pare things down until you’re left with only the most important stuff. Then do it again. You can always add stuff back in later if you need to.

当遇到困难时,人们的本能反应都是加大投入:增加人手、延长时间、加大投资,这一切做法只是使问题变得越大。正确的方法应该是反其道而行之:削减。

When things aren’t working, the natural inclination is to throw more at the problem. More people, time, and money. All that ends up doing is making the problem bigger. The right way to go is the opposite direction: Cut back.

要记住,时尚会凋零。只有当你聚焦于长久的功能时,你才会发现自己把握住了永不落伍的东西。

Remember, fashion fades away. When you focus on permanent features, you’re in bed with things that never go out of style.

就用你现在手头有的或者能负担得起的,然后开始做吧。工具不重要,就用现有的工具也可以做得一样棒,音乐就在你的指尖流淌。

Use whatever you’ve got already or can afford cheaply. Then go. It’s not the gear that matters. It’s playing what you’ve got as well as you can. Your tone is in your fingers.

副产品无处不在。一个善于观察、富于创意的商业头脑能够注意到这些副产品,并从中挖掘出商机。

You can’t make just one thing. Everything has a by-product. Observant and creative business minds spot these by-products and see opportunities.

为了迅速上线,要砍掉一些不必要的东西。现在就把必要的部分做出来,以后再去考虑花哨的部分。如果你真的这么想了,你就能找出一大堆无须在第一天上线时就能完成的东西。

Put off anything you don’t need for launch. Build the necessities now, worry about the luxuries later. If you really think about it, there’s a whole lot you don’t need on day one.

这个做法只是告诉你,最有效的成功方法就是不断尝试。不要再臆测到底会发生什么事了,到现实中去寻找答案吧。

This approach just recognizes that the best way to get there is through iterations. Stop imagining what’s going to work. Find out for real.

效率篇 CHAPTER PRODUCTIVITY

如果你一定要说明某事,那就务实一点。不要描述它长什么样子,直接画出来;不要解释它的声音如何,直接哼出来。要尽一切可能去掉那些抽象的东西。

If you need to explain something, try getting real with it. Instead of describing what something looks like, draw it. Instead of explaining what something sounds like, hum it. Do everything you can to remove layers of abstraction.

抽象事物(比如报告和文件)会给人造成认知错觉。让 100 个人读同一段话时,他们的脑子里会想象出 100 种不同的意思。这就是我们要求尽量贴近实际的原因。只有这样才能让人真正理解你的想法。

The problem with abstractions (like reports and documents) is that they create illusions of agreement. A hundred people can read the same words, but in their heads, they’re imagining a hundred different things. That’s why you want to get to something real right away. That’s when you get true understanding.

你需要问自己几个重要的问题,以确定你是否是在做真正有意义的事情:1)为什么要这么做? 2)你在解决什么问题? 3)这真的有用吗? 4)你加上去的东西有价值吗? 5)这种改变真的会起作用吗? 6)这种方法更简单吗? 7)有其他更值得做的事情吗?8)这样做值得吗?

Here are some important questions to ask yourself to ensure you’re doing work that matters: 1)Why are you doing this? 2)What problem are you solving? 3)Is this actually useful? 4)Are you adding value? 5)Will this change behavior? 6)Is there an easier way? 7)What could you be doing instead? 8)Is it really worth it?

同样,要勇于亮出你的结论。有时候放弃其实是一步好棋,即使你已经为之投入了很多努力,也不要继续把大好的时间浪费在不值得做的事情上。

Also, don’t be timid about your conclusions. Sometimes abandoning what you’re working on is the right move, even if you’ve already put in a lot of effort. Don’t throw good time after bad work.

反之,你应该达到一种旁若无人的境界。长时间的单独工作能使你达到最高效率。当你不再为了不同的任务去切换思维时,你能干完一整车活儿。(有没有注意过自己在飞机上那种零打扰、无网络的状态下能达到怎样的工作效率?)

Instead, you should get in the alone zone. Long stretches of alone time are when you’re most productive. When you don’t have to mind-shift between various tasks, you get a boatload done. (Ever notice how much work you get done on a plane since you’re offline and there are zero outside distractions?)

就这样一直下去,一个成功的独立时段意味着戒掉八卦瘾。在这个时段内,封锁即时聊天工具、挂掉电话、关闭邮箱、叫停回忆。唯一能做的就是闭嘴、干活。你会惊讶于自己居然能干这么多活。

And go all the way with it. A successful alone-time period means letting go of communication addiction. During alone time, give up instant messages, phone calls, e- mail, and meetings. Just shut up and get to work. You’ll be surprised how much more you get done.

世界上最可恨的打扰莫过于开会。

The worst interruptions of all are meetings.

如果你们觉得你们“必须”聚在一起讨论些事情,那么请坚持以下几条简单的原则,让会议变得更有效率……

If you decide you absolutely must get together, try to make your meeting a productive one by sticking to these simple rules…

我们总能用简单平常的方法去解决问题。这也就意味着不需要超炫的表现,你没有机会炫耀你的超强技术。你只’找个办法把问题解决就行了,赶紧去办下一件事去。这种方案也许没法为你带来声声喝彩,但是能让你不断前行。

Problems can usually be solved with simple, mundane solutions. That means there’s no glamorous work. You don’t get to show off your amazing skills. You just build something that gets the job done and then move on. This approach may not earn you oohs and aahs, but it lets you get on with it.

积累动力的方法就是完成一项任务,然后紧接着去完成下一项任务。

The way you build momentum is by getting something done and then moving on to the next thing.

要谨记:最明显的解决方案有可能就是适时退出。人们容易自然而然地把放弃和失败联系起来,但有时你就该这么做。如果你已经在不值得做的事情上浪费了很多时间,那就赶快走开。失去的时间是再也找不回来了。现在最糟糕的事莫过于继续浪费时间。

Keep in mind that the obvious solution might very well be quitting. People automatically associate quitting with failure, but sometimes that’s exactly what you should do. If you already spent too much time on something that wasn’t worth it, walk away. You can’t get that time back. The worst thing you can do now is waste even more time.

废寝忘食可不是什么好主意。没错,熬夜确实能立马挤出不少时间,但是以后你得为此付出沉痛的代价:你的创造力、士气和心态都将遭到毁灭性的打击。

Forgoing sleep is a bad idea. Sure, you get those extra hours right now, but you pay in spades later: You destroy your creativity, morale, and attitude.

我们都是蹩脚的估算师。我们自以为能预测一项任务会耗时多久,但实际上我们一无所知。

We’re all terrible estimators. We think we can guess how long something will take, when we really have no idea.

解决方案就是:把大项目分解成小任务。越小的任务越容易估计。你可能还是会犯错,但错得肯定不会像预测大项目那么离谱。如果某个任务所用的时间比预计长两倍,那么最好把它从长达数月的大项目拆解成耗时几周的小项目。

The solution: Break the big thing into smaller things. The smaller it is, the easier it is to estimate. You’re probably still going to get it wrong, but you’ll be a lot less wrong than if you estimated a big project. If something takes twice as long as you expected, better to have it be a small project that’s a couple weeks over rather than a long one that’s a couple months over.

列一个更小的待办事务清单。长篇大论的清单只能徒惹尘埃。

Start making smaller to-do lists too. Long lists collect dust.

只要有可能,就把问题拆解成一个一个的小片段,直到你能够完全迅速地解决每一个小问题。很简单,这样安排你的任务,就能对你的生产力和积极性产生惊人的影响。

Whenever you can, divide problems into smaller and smaller pieces until you’re able to deal with them completely and quickly. Simply rearranging your tasks this way can have an amazing impact on your productivity and motivation.

相反,我们应该尽量选择一些能够被有效替换的小决策。小决策不会造成大麻烦。这些小决策意味着你能够接受改变。即使是搞砸了,也不会付出惨痛代价,只要修复一下就好了。

Instead, make choices that are small enough that they’re effectively temporary. When you make tiny decisions, you can’t make big mistakes. These small decisions mean you can afford to change. There’s no big penalty if you mess up. You just fix it.

对手篇 CHAPTER COMPETITORS

这样做的问题在于,简单复制扼杀了深层的理解——而理解才能激发成长。你不但要知其然,还要知其所以然。当你复制、粘贴时,就会忽略这一点。你照搬的只是表面现象,而不是其深层的本质。

The problem with this sort of copying is it skips understanding–and understanding is how you grow. You have to understand why something works or why something is the way it is. When you just copy and paste, you miss that. You just repurpose the last layer instead of understanding all the layers underneath.

一旦你扬名立万,模仿者便会蜂拥而上,这就是生活。但是你可以用一种绝佳的方法来保护自己不被盲从者们吞没:让你自己成为你的产品或服务的一部分。将你独一无二的想法注入你的产品中,让它与众不同。把它变成一件别人做不到的东西。

If you’re successful, people will try to copy what you do. It’s just a fact of life. But there’s a great way to protect yourself from copycats: Make you part of your product or service. Inject what’s unique about the way you think into what you sell. Decommoditize your product. Make it something no one else can offer.

如果你觉得某个竞争对手不厚道,只管大声说出来。当你这么做的时候,你会发现有一拨支持者聚集在你身边。当一个反对者是标新立异和吸引跟随着的捷径。

If you think a competitor sucks, say so. When you do that, you’ll find that others who agree with you will rally to your side. Being the anti-____ is a great way to differentiate yourself and attract followers.

那么你应该怎么做呢?要做得比你的对手少,并以此来击败他们。解决最简单的问题,把那些纠结的、困难的、令人厌恶的难题留给他们解决。不要总想着胜人一筹,试试退一步海阔天空。不要逞强,要适当示弱。

So what do you do instead? Do less than your competitors to beat them. Solve the simple problems and leave the hairy, difficult, nasty problems to the competition. Instead of one-upping, try one-downing. Instead of outdoing, try underdoing.

最后要提到的是,你的竞争对手不值得去关注。过多关注竞争对手会分散你的视线。当你的脑子里充斥着他人的想法时,就会错过发现新鲜创意的机会。你会从富有远见的人变成固步自封的人,最终为你的竞争对手做嫁衣裳。

In the end, it’s not worth paying much attention to the competition anyway. Focus on competitors too much and you wind up diluting your own vision. Your chances of coming up with something fresh go way down when you keep feeding your brain other people’s ideas. You become reactionary instead of visionary. You wind up offering your competitor’s products with a different coat of paint.

进化篇 CHAPTER EVOLUTION

唯唯诺诺很容易。人们很容易同意添加一项新功能、接受一个过于乐观的最后期限、笑纳一个平庸的设计。很快,这些轻易过关的事物堆积起来,在你眼前越堆越高,你甚至都看不到现在该做的事情了。

It’s so easy to say yes. Yes to another feature, yes to an overly optimistic deadline,

yes to a mediocre design. Soon, the stack of things you’ve said yes to grows so tall you can’t even see the things you should really be doing.

现在就开始培养说“不”的习惯——即使是面对自己最好的创意。利用拒绝的力量,成就你的优先顺序。人们很少会因为拒绝而后悔,却常常宁愿自己当初没有答应别人。

Start getting into the habit of saying no–even to many of your best ideas. Use the power of no to get your priorities straight. You rarely regret saying no. But you often wind up regretting saying yes.

人在变,环境也在变,你不可能满足所有人的所有要求。公司要对某一类型的客户全情投入,而不是对某一个善变的客户唯唯诺诺。

People and situations change. You can’t be everything to everyone. Companies need to be true to a type of customer more than a specific individual customer with changing needs.

所以,首先要把你的伟大想法冷却一下。要想尽一切办法找出所有伟大的创意,让自己激情澎湃一把,但是不要轻举妄动。把他们都写下来,然后放上几天,在用冷静下来的思路去为它们安排优先顺序吧。

So let your latest grand ideas cool off for a while first. By all means, have as many great ideas as you can. Get excited about them. Just don’t act in the heat of the moment. Write them down and park them for a few days. Then, evaluate their actual priority with a calm mind.

当你制造出一个能成为“镇宅之宝”的产品时,可能要因此牺牲一些“镇店”的噱头。一个能够完美演绎基本功能的产品,势必在花哨程度上要略逊对手一筹。长于某些功能的产品,远远看上去肯定不是那么面面俱到。这没什么,毕竟你的目标是与它建立长期关系,而不是“一夜情”。

When you create an at-home-good product, you may have to sacrifice a bit of in- store sizzle. A product that executes on the basics beautifully may not seem as sexy as competitors loaded with bells and whistles. Being great at a few things often doesn’t look all that flashy from afar. That’s OK. You’re aiming for a long-term relationship, not a one-night stand.

如果某个要求被你一次一次地遗忘在脑后,这就说明这个要求并不是太重要——真正重要的东西是忘不掉的。

If there’s a request that you keep forgetting, that’s a sign that it isn’t very important. The really important stuff doesn’t go away.

推广篇 CHAPTER PROMOTION

现在的你籍籍无名,这是件好事。籍籍无名就是一个绝佳状态,你要庆幸自己目前还身处暗处。

No one knows who you are right now. And that’s just fine. Being obscure is a great position to be in. Be happy you’re in the shadows.

要充分利用这段时间,这是犯再大的错也没人知晓。要保持低调,你可以利用这段时间继续调整你的策略,解决纠结的问题、测试各种创意、尝试新事物。没有人认识你,所以弄砸了也没有关系,起于浮萍之末,能最大限度地保住你的自尊和自信。

Use this time to make mistakes without the whole world hearing about them. Keep tweaking. Work out the kinks. Test random ideas. Try new things. No one knows you, so it’s no big deal if you mess up. Obscurity helps protect your ego and preserve your confidence.

一旦培养出观众群体,你就不用再花钱去赚取眼球——人们会主动关注你。这是一个巨大的竞争优势。

When you build an audience, you don’t have to buy people’s attention–they give it to you. This is a huge advantage.

所以,赶快培养观众群体吧。说些什么、写点儿什么、开个博客、整个微博、制作视频——总之,想尽一切办法。大方地分享有价值的信息,你就会慢慢建立起忠实的观众群体。然后,当你想传达消息时,自然就会有人在那儿倾听了。

So build an audience. Speak, write, blog, tweet, make videos–whatever. Share information that’s valuable and you’ll slowly but surely build a loyal audience. Then when you need to get the word out, the right people will already be listening.

传道授业能为你建立起凝聚力,这是传统市场策略不可望其项背的。

Teach and you’ll form a bond you just don’t get from traditional marketing tactics.

大度的人不应该继续模仿小气者的行为,不要惧怕分享。

And those that don’t should stop acting like those that do. Don’t be afraid of sharing.

让人们走入幕后,能改善你和他们之间的关系。他们会感到与你亲切起来,将你视为一个常人,而不是一个面目模糊的公司。他们将在你的产品中看到你在后台淌下的汗水和付出的努力。他们会对你的工作产生更深刻的理解和更诚挚的感激。

Letting people behind the curtain changes your relationship with them. They’ll feel a bond with you and see you as human beings instead of a faceless company. They’ll see the sweat and effort that goes into what you sell. They’ll develop a deeper level of understanding and appreciation for what you do.

不要害怕让人看到你的缺点。不完美才真实,真实才能激起人们的共鸣。

Don’t be afraid to show your flaws. Imperfections are real and people respond to real.

招聘篇

救灾篇

文化篇

总结篇

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